A Blueprint For The Future Of Dermatology.

An Introduction.

An Introduction.

I cured my lifelong eczema.

Catchy intro eh? 😏

Except it fails to mention the years of experimentation, the methods that actually worked, and the tiny detail that ‘cure’ just isn’t the right word. But that’s all to come…

This has been a long time coming. We’ve spent years building the Proton Health app; a digital health solution that enables individuals to self-manage their skin condition. During this time, we’ve had the privilege to work with thousands of patients, clinicians and dermatology organisations. This has helped us to achieve industry leading results, with 48% symptomatic improvement, 32% mental health elevation and retention that’s 18x the benchmarks.

And now, we’re opening up on how we’ve achieved it and where we see the field of dermatology heading. We’ve called it A Blueprint for The Future Dermatology. Why I hear you asking? It’s simple. We’re a team that has a flair for extravagant titles. So much so, that we’ll codename a simple website colour change as ‘Operation Firefly’.

But this isn’t your typical blueprint, full of hard-to-read charts or technical language. Instead, it’ll be a personal account of my experience with eczema, our collective learning as clinical doctors and years of expertise treating thousands with skin conditions.

This Blueprint is designed for anyone with an interest in dermatology. If you’re an individual with a lifelong skin condition, you’ll find the secrets behind how I transformed my eczema. And if you’re a dermatology organisation, you’ll discover recommendations to truly cater towards those with skin conditions.

But first, it’s time for a trip down memory lane…

I cured my lifelong eczema.

Catchy intro eh? 😏

Except it fails to mention the years of experimentation, the methods that actually worked, and the tiny detail that ‘cure’ just isn’t the right word. But that’s all to come…

This has been a long time coming. We’ve spent years building the Proton Health app; a digital health solution that enables individuals to self-manage their skin condition. During this time, we’ve had the privilege to work with thousands of patients, clinicians and dermatology organisations. This has helped us to achieve industry leading results, with 48% symptomatic improvement, 32% mental health elevation and retention that’s 18x the benchmarks.

And now, we’re opening up on how we’ve achieved it and where we see the field of dermatology heading. We’ve called it A Blueprint for The Future Dermatology. Why I hear you asking? It’s simple. We’re a team that has a flair for extravagant titles. So much so, that we’ll codename a simple website colour change as ‘Operation Firefly’.

But this isn’t your typical blueprint, full of hard-to-read charts or technical language. Instead, it’ll be a personal account of my experience with eczema, our collective learning as clinical doctors and years of expertise treating thousands with skin conditions.

This Blueprint is designed for anyone with an interest in dermatology. If you’re an individual with a lifelong skin condition, you’ll find the secrets behind how I transformed my eczema. And if you’re a dermatology organisation, you’ll discover recommendations to truly cater towards those with skin conditions.

But first, it’s time for a trip down memory lane…

Our Backstory.

A team of doctors, technologists and individuals with lifelong skin conditions.

Our Backstory.

A team of doctors, technologists and individuals with lifelong skin conditions.

I was diagnosed with eczema at the tender age of 2 weeks. Not that I remember of course. What I do know is that things were pretty bad growing up. So bad that my dermatologist let slip that my eczema was the worst he’s ever seen. Ouch.

My memories include having to miss school to attend appointments, routinely being bandaged head to toe and being subject to all manner of whacky treatments. Needless to say, I felt like the odd one out. (The ‘Red Paint’ visible on my face, also known as Iodine treatment, didn’t exactly help my cause.)

Despite these experiences, it was my dermatologist, Dr Miller, and dermatology nurse, Hayley, with their warmth and exceptional levels of care who inspired me to choose a career in medicine.

Fast forward a few years, and I had the privilege to follow in their footsteps and practice as a doctor with the aim of serving others just like me.

But along the way, something went wrong.

Despite my medical expertise and 20+ years of living with the condition, I still found myself flaring up. And often, considerably worse than before. With weekly flare-ups that wouldn’t go away, facial inflammation that made it painful to speak, fear of leaving the house out of embarrassment and perpetual worry of the next flare-up over the horizon.

Obviously, this wasn’t part of the script.

Yet, this is the norm for hundreds of millions with long-term skin conditions. Whether it’s Acne, Eczema, Psoriasis, Topical Steroid Withdrawal or the countless others, all have devastating symptoms that feel impossible to overcome.

But what’s often overlooked is that these conditions go much deeper than the skin, impacting everything from sleep, relationships, self-confidence, and most damaging - a complete lack of control. Almost like a prisoner in your own skin, not knowing when your next sentence will begin or end.

So the question is, if a doctor that’s spent decades living with eczema can’t manage their skin condition, what hope does anyone else have?

This question inspired the creation of Proton Health.

The first glimpse of the idea originated in a small coffee shop in Holborn, London. Whilst discussing this frustration, me, my best friend Niall and now-wife Noreen created the initial concept of a super-connector in dermatology. And it’s the very reason why today, I’m flare up free, with virtually no lasting impact from 20+ years of eczema.

To understand how I overcame my eczema and how to leverage this experience, we need to explore the barriers associated with dermatology. Starting with the fact that current approaches simply aren’t that effective…

I was diagnosed with eczema at the tender age of 2 weeks. Not that I remember of course. What I do know is that things were pretty bad growing up. So bad that my dermatologist let slip that my eczema was the worst he’s ever seen. Ouch.

My memories include having to miss school to attend appointments, routinely being bandaged head to toe and being subject to all manner of whacky treatments. Needless to say, I felt like the odd one out. (The ‘Red Paint’ visible on my face, also known as Iodine treatment, didn’t exactly help my cause.)

Despite these experiences, it was my dermatologist, Dr Miller, and dermatology nurse, Hayley, with their warmth and exceptional levels of care who inspired me to choose a career in medicine.

Fast forward a few years, and I had the privilege to follow in their footsteps and practice as a doctor with the aim of serving others just like me.

But along the way, something went wrong.

Despite my medical expertise and 20+ years of living with the condition, I still found myself flaring up. And often, considerably worse than before. With weekly flare-ups that wouldn’t go away, facial inflammation that made it painful to speak, fear of leaving the house out of embarrassment and perpetual worry of the next flare-up over the horizon.

Obviously, this wasn’t part of the script.

Yet, this is the norm for hundreds of millions with long-term skin conditions. Whether it’s Acne, Eczema, Psoriasis, Topical Steroid Withdrawal or the countless others, all have devastating symptoms that feel impossible to overcome.

But what’s often overlooked is that these conditions go much deeper than the skin, impacting everything from sleep, relationships, self-confidence, and most damaging - a complete lack of control. Almost like a prisoner in your own skin, not knowing when your next sentence will begin or end.

So the question is, if a doctor that’s spent decades living with eczema can’t manage their skin condition, what hope does anyone else have?

This question inspired the creation of Proton Health.

The first glimpse of the idea originated in a small coffee shop in Holborn, London. Whilst discussing this frustration, me, my best friend Niall and now-wife Noreen created the initial concept of a super-connector in dermatology. And it’s the very reason why today, I’m flare up free, with virtually no lasting impact from 20+ years of eczema.

To understand how I overcame my eczema and how to leverage this experience, we need to explore the barriers associated with dermatology. Starting with the fact that current approaches simply aren’t that effective…

The Barriers Within Dermatology.

1. Current Approaches Aren’t Effective.

Treatment Failure Rate

>60%

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The Barriers Within Dermatology.

1. Current Approaches Aren’t Effective.

Treatment Failure Rate

>60%

Premium UX Template for Framer

The Barriers Within Dermatology.

1. Current Approaches Aren’t Effective.

Treatment Failure Rate

>60%

Premium UX Template for Framer

“Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” Einstein.

Based on this quote, I and millions of others are indeed insane. We find ourselves asking the same questions, using the same treatments and doing the same things, but with little to no improvement. It’s why, as a 20 year old, I gave up hope and accepted that eczema would forever be a problem that I’d have to accept.

The evidence supports this, because treatments don't work most of the time, with only a 60% failure rate.¹ There are a few reasons for this:

  • Triggers are difficult to identify - the research shows that hundreds of different things can trigger skin conditions. Everything from personal factors like sleep and mood to environmental aspects like air pollution and humidity. But the sheer amount of possible triggers makes it extremely difficult to pinpoint the culprit based on current methods. This means we’re often left to firefight vs actually getting to the source of the problem.²

  • We can’t predict flare-ups - because they are cyclical in nature, it’s difficult to know when the next one will arrive. This means we’re always on the back-foot, a bit like trying to catch a train after it’s left the station.

  • Trial and error approach - we still rely on making educated guesses to figure out which therapies will work for each person. In practice, this means that individuals have to try many products in their lifetime, and still may not find the ideal treatment.²

These challenges are largely due to the difficulties of personalising care at scale. Unfortunately, healthcare professionals can’t be with individuals at all times to overcome these barriers. And even if they could, it’s virtually impossible to piece all of these aspects together to effectively solve these problems.

“Insanity is doing the same thing over and over again and expecting different results.” Einstein.

Based on this quote, I and millions of others are indeed insane. We find ourselves asking the same questions, using the same treatments and doing the same things, but with little to no improvement. It’s why, as a 20 year old, I gave up hope and accepted that eczema would forever be a problem that I’d have to accept.

The evidence supports this, because treatments don't work most of the time, with only a 60% failure rate.¹ There are a few reasons for this:

  • Triggers are difficult to identify - the research shows that hundreds of different things can trigger skin conditions. Everything from personal factors like sleep and mood to environmental aspects like air pollution and humidity. But the sheer amount of possible triggers makes it extremely difficult to pinpoint the culprit based on current methods. This means we’re often left to firefight vs actually getting to the source of the problem.²

  • We can’t predict flare-ups - because they are cyclical in nature, it’s difficult to know when the next one will arrive. This means we’re always on the back-foot, a bit like trying to catch a train after it’s left the station.

  • Trial and error approach - we still rely on making educated guesses to figure out which therapies will work for each person. In practice, this means that individuals have to try many products in their lifetime, and still may not find the ideal treatment.²

These challenges are largely due to the difficulties of personalising care at scale. Unfortunately, healthcare professionals can’t be with individuals at all times to overcome these barriers. And even if they could, it’s virtually impossible to piece all of these aspects together to effectively solve these problems.

2. Care Doesn’t Go Beyond The Skin.

Mental Health Burden

>50%

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2. Care Doesn’t Go Beyond The Skin.

Mental Health Burden

>50%

Premium UX Template for Framer

2. Care Doesn’t Go Beyond The Skin.

Mental Health Burden

>50%

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Deeper Than The Skin

Did you know that 50% of people with a long-term skin condition experience either anxiety or depression emotional impact?³ The numbers are truly staggering.

But when you delve a bit deeper, it’s easy to understand why. Often, breakouts appear out of the blue. Which leaves people feeling completely out of the control. Like prisoners in their own skin, awaiting their next sentence. This naturally leads to constant worry about why and when the next flare-up will take hold. A feeling that's heightened during important social and work events.

To make matters worse, living with a skin condition can have knock on effects. With evidence showing it impacts sleep, relationships, work, self-esteem and much more. This is best illustrated by the statistics:

  • 30-50% of people experience sleep disturbance due to their skin condition.⁴

  • ~1/3 of individuals spend more than an hour managing their skin condition each year.⁵

  • Nearly 1/4 of individuals miss more than 6 days of work per year. Over 6 work days are lost each year due to flare-ups.⁶

  • The average out-of-pocket expense for individuals with skin conditions is approximately $600 per year.⁷

  • The direct cost of skin conditions is at least $75 Billion in the US alone, with a further $11 Billion in indirect costs.⁸

  • 82% of individuals with a mental health condition don't seek help due to a lack of availability and awareness of resources.⁹

Despite this impact, there’s very little awareness of the mental health aspects of skin conditions. Instead, it's usually dismissed as “It's only a rash", 'Worrying over nothing" or being told to "Just stop scratching".

The Stress-Breakout Cycle

The evidence suggests that psychological stress itself is a huge cause of breakouts and vice versa. This is explained by the stress-breakout cycle.

In essence, when someone experiences stress, there’s an up-regulation of stress chemicals. These chemicals increase the likelihood of inflammation, a key component in long-term skin conditions like Acne, Eczema and Psoriasis. As the skin condition worsens, we’re then more likely to experience even more stress, which creates a vicious cycle that can be difficult to tackle. ¹⁰

Harmful Mental Habits

A relatively unknown topic relates to harmful habits that are formed over time. Specifically, these include scratching and picking, which are common programmed responses to feeling itchy and seeing a spot. Also called the itch-scratch and picking-breakout cycles, these are key drivers for continued symptoms in skin conditions.

For instance, I found myself scratching more than 180 times each day. This is despite the fact I often don’t feel itchy. The habit was just so engrained that I’d been mindlessly damaging my skin throughout the day.

To understand this damage, some researchers actually scratched individuals without a skin condition ~100 times each day. After looking at the impact under a microscope, they discovered that the skin actually looked exactly the same as eczema. Eczema was created in individuals without eczema, simply by the act of scratching.¹²

The other harmful habits are the words that we tell ourselves each day. As an example, many people will wake up, look at themselves in the mirror and pick out flaws on their face. Over time, this becomes obsessive, identifying inconsistencies that are almost impossible for others to see and repeating negative comments in our head.

This is the slippery slope that leaves people lacking confidence and experiencing low self-esteem. It's the very process that had me looking in the mirror every 15 mins, or telling myself I'd only be happy if xyz mark disappeared. Which is pretty much setting myself up for failure.

These thoughts and habits are very much like addictions, except we don't realise that we're addicted.¹³ So a large part of tackling these problems are by building awareness and using habit-reversal techniques to break these cycles. More on this soon…

Deeper Than The Skin

Did you know that 50% of people with a long-term skin condition experience either anxiety or depression emotional impact?³ The numbers are truly staggering.

But when you delve a bit deeper, it’s easy to understand why. Often, breakouts appear out of the blue. Which leaves people feeling completely out of the control. Like prisoners in their own skin, awaiting their next sentence. This naturally leads to constant worry about why and when the next flare-up will take hold. A feeling that's heightened during important social and work events.

To make matters worse, living with a skin condition can have knock on effects. With evidence showing it impacts sleep, relationships, work, self-esteem and much more. This is best illustrated by the statistics:

  • 30-50% of people experience sleep disturbance due to their skin condition.⁴

  • ~1/3 of individuals spend more than an hour managing their skin condition each year.⁵

  • Nearly 1/4 of individuals miss more than 6 days of work per year. Over 6 work days are lost each year due to flare-ups.⁶

  • The average out-of-pocket expense for individuals with skin conditions is approximately $600 per year.⁷

  • The direct cost of skin conditions is at least $75 Billion in the US alone, with a further $11 Billion in indirect costs.⁸

  • 82% of individuals with a mental health condition don't seek help due to a lack of availability and awareness of resources.⁹

Despite this impact, there’s very little awareness of the mental health aspects of skin conditions. Instead, it's usually dismissed as “It's only a rash", 'Worrying over nothing" or being told to "Just stop scratching".

The Stress-Breakout Cycle

The evidence suggests that psychological stress itself is a huge cause of breakouts and vice versa. This is explained by the stress-breakout cycle.

In essence, when someone experiences stress, there’s an up-regulation of stress chemicals. These chemicals increase the likelihood of inflammation, a key component in long-term skin conditions like Acne, Eczema and Psoriasis. As the skin condition worsens, we’re then more likely to experience even more stress, which creates a vicious cycle that can be difficult to tackle. ¹⁰

Harmful Mental Habits

A relatively unknown topic relates to harmful habits that are formed over time. Specifically, these include scratching and picking, which are common programmed responses to feeling itchy and seeing a spot. Also called the itch-scratch and picking-breakout cycles, these are key drivers for continued symptoms in skin conditions.

For instance, I found myself scratching more than 180 times each day. This is despite the fact I often don’t feel itchy. The habit was just so engrained that I’d been mindlessly damaging my skin throughout the day.

To understand this damage, some researchers actually scratched individuals without a skin condition ~100 times each day. After looking at the impact under a microscope, they discovered that the skin actually looked exactly the same as eczema. Eczema was created in individuals without eczema, simply by the act of scratching.¹²

The other harmful habits are the words that we tell ourselves each day. As an example, many people will wake up, look at themselves in the mirror and pick out flaws on their face. Over time, this becomes obsessive, identifying inconsistencies that are almost impossible for others to see and repeating negative comments in our head.

This is the slippery slope that leaves people lacking confidence and experiencing low self-esteem. It's the very process that had me looking in the mirror every 15 mins, or telling myself I'd only be happy if xyz mark disappeared. Which is pretty much setting myself up for failure.

These thoughts and habits are very much like addictions, except we don't realise that we're addicted.¹³ So a large part of tackling these problems are by building awareness and using habit-reversal techniques to break these cycles. More on this soon…

3. Healthcare Access Is Limited.

Dermatology Waiting List

>6 Months

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3. Healthcare Access Is Limited.

Dermatology Waiting List

>6 Months

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3. Healthcare Access Is Limited.

Dermatology Waiting List

>6 Months

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Dermatologists Are In Short Supply

A stark change from the past is that accessing a healthcare professional is much more difficult. From childhood, I distinctly remember having access to my dermatologist on a fortnightly basis, the ability to have a GP consultation in days and regular home-visits from our dermatology nurse.

Contrast this with current times, where people are often waiting more than a year for a dermatologist, GP consultations take weeks and home visits are a thing of the past.⁶ It’s easy to blame healthcare professionals for this, but having seen it from both sides, this couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, there are multiple other reasons:

  • More people are being diagnosed with long-term skin conditions at a time where there’s a severe shortage of dermatologists.¹⁴ In the UK, there’s only 1 dermatologist for every 100,000 people; in fact, there are a hundred times more Lamborghinis on Britains roads than there are dermatologists. And the resources aren’t in place to tackle this deficit any time soon.¹⁵

  • Time-critical conditions like skin cancer require more urgent treatment, with targets being set to see at-risk individuals within 2 weeks. Understandably, these cases take priority, which means dermatologists are occupied and have less bandwidth to see those with long-term skin conditions.

  • The average consultation time has decreased, so fewer topics can be covered during each visit. At the same time more paperwork needs to be completed, the number of possible treatments has increased and skin conditions are becoming more complex to treat.¹⁶ This pressure explains why 45% of dermatologist experience burn out during their careers.¹⁷

GPs Are Now The Main Carers

These bottlenecks have meant that GPs are now tasked with treating those with long-term skin condition. But this was never part of the plan, with their training equipping them for initial diagnosis and ongoing management only. Not to treat complex conditions alone. It’s the equivalent of learning to become a car mechanic, and then being expected to service a plane.

The evidence backs this up, showing that GPs aren’t equipped to manage long-term conditions.¹⁸ From personal experience, I only received one week of medical school teaching focussed on the entirety of dermatology. Yet still found myself treating individuals with skin conditions in GP practices. It’s clear, that a more viable method is needed that gives individuals immediate access to high quality medical support.

Dermatologists Are In Short Supply

A stark change from the past is that accessing a healthcare professional is much more difficult. From childhood, I distinctly remember having access to my dermatologist on a fortnightly basis, the ability to have a GP consultation in days and regular home-visits from our dermatology nurse.

Contrast this with current times, where people are often waiting more than a year for a dermatologist, GP consultations take weeks and home visits are a thing of the past.⁶ It’s easy to blame healthcare professionals for this, but having seen it from both sides, this couldn’t be further from the truth. In fact, there are multiple other reasons:

  • More people are being diagnosed with long-term skin conditions at a time where there’s a severe shortage of dermatologists.¹⁴ In the UK, there’s only 1 dermatologist for every 100,000 people; in fact, there are a hundred times more Lamborghinis on Britains roads than there are dermatologists. And the resources aren’t in place to tackle this deficit any time soon.¹⁵

  • Time-critical conditions like skin cancer require more urgent treatment, with targets being set to see at-risk individuals within 2 weeks. Understandably, these cases take priority, which means dermatologists are occupied and have less bandwidth to see those with long-term skin conditions.

  • The average consultation time has decreased, so fewer topics can be covered during each visit. At the same time more paperwork needs to be completed, the number of possible treatments has increased and skin conditions are becoming more complex to treat.¹⁶ This pressure explains why 45% of dermatologist experience burn out during their careers.¹⁷

GPs Are Now The Main Carers

These bottlenecks have meant that GPs are now tasked with treating those with long-term skin condition. But this was never part of the plan, with their training equipping them for initial diagnosis and ongoing management only. Not to treat complex conditions alone. It’s the equivalent of learning to become a car mechanic, and then being expected to service a plane.

The evidence backs this up, showing that GPs aren’t equipped to manage long-term conditions.¹⁸ From personal experience, I only received one week of medical school teaching focussed on the entirety of dermatology. Yet still found myself treating individuals with skin conditions in GP practices. It’s clear, that a more viable method is needed that gives individuals immediate access to high quality medical support.

4. It’s Difficult To Know Who To Trust.

We've demonstrated groundbreaking outcomes by delivering personalisation. Our platform unlocks these outcomes and improves your products efficacy.

Products On Market

>100,000

Premium UX Template for Framer

4. It’s Difficult To Know Who To Trust.

We've demonstrated groundbreaking outcomes by delivering personalisation. Our platform unlocks these outcomes and improves your products efficacy.

Products On Market

>100,000

Premium UX Template for Framer

4. It’s Difficult To Know Who To Trust.

We've demonstrated groundbreaking outcomes by delivering personalisation. Our platform unlocks these outcomes and improves your products efficacy.

Products On Market

>100,000

Premium UX Template for Framer

Misuse Is Common

The lack of access to healthcare has created a huge information void, leaving people to figure things out on their own. Take my experience - I was prescribed Steroids (a stronger therapy to treat eczema flare-ups) at the age of 7. Whilst they worked well, I eventually found myself needing and being prescribed higher doses.

Over the years, whenever I experienced flare-ups, I’d use these higher doses on my face and body, all the way into my twenties.

The problem?

These steroids were 1000x the strength of the products I should’ve been using.

They weren’t allowed to be used on the face.

Oh, and the maximum time I could use them at any one time was 7 days, not ahem, 14 years.

From this misuse, I experienced side effects like skin thinning and pigmentation. But more broadly, there’s now a known severe reaction to overusing steroids and stopping them abruptly, Topical Steroid Withdrawal, which is a truly devastating condition causing generalised inflammation.

The point is, poor healthcare access doesn’t just prevent people from getting better, it very often makes symptoms much worse.¹⁹

There’s A Lot Of Nonsense Out There

But this is just one example of the harms of misuse in the dermatology space. Others come in the forms of miracle techniques, magic creams that supposedly cure conditions and all other manners of false hope.

In fact, one paper showed that many apps that were harmful. That's right, even services designed specifically to provide education, are littered with misinformation that makes skin conditions worse.²⁰

The Choices Are Endless

So there’s an information vacuum, and the advice that fills it is often nonsense. If that wasn’t bad enough, there is also just too much choice when it comes to skincare products. Individuals are left with the daunting task of searching through thousands of products.²¹ You might think this is a good thing, giving people the choice of any product for their needs. But in the absence of someone to navigate this, too many options cause decision paralysis.²² This is made worse because ingredients are difficult to understand, and it's not always clear why or when a product should be used over another.

It's the reason why, at just 20, I settled for experiencing flare-ups every few days. Exhausted, not knowing where to start and experiencing decision paralysis. And I’m not alone, with 69% of people feeling helpless and choosing to self-care, without any input from traditional healthcare and defaulting to DIY treatments.²³ So clearly, something has to change…

Misuse Is Common

The lack of access to healthcare has created a huge information void, leaving people to figure things out on their own. Take my experience - I was prescribed Steroids (a stronger therapy to treat eczema flare-ups) at the age of 7. Whilst they worked well, I eventually found myself needing and being prescribed higher doses.

Over the years, whenever I experienced flare-ups, I’d use these higher doses on my face and body, all the way into my twenties.

The problem?

These steroids were 1000x the strength of the products I should’ve been using.

They weren’t allowed to be used on the face.

Oh, and the maximum time I could use them at any one time was 7 days, not ahem, 14 years.

From this misuse, I experienced side effects like skin thinning and pigmentation. But more broadly, there’s now a known severe reaction to overusing steroids and stopping them abruptly, Topical Steroid Withdrawal, which is a truly devastating condition causing generalised inflammation.

The point is, poor healthcare access doesn’t just prevent people from getting better, it very often makes symptoms much worse.¹⁹

There’s A Lot Of Nonsense Out There

But this is just one example of the harms of misuse in the dermatology space. Others come in the forms of miracle techniques, magic creams that supposedly cure conditions and all other manners of false hope.

In fact, one paper showed that many apps that were harmful. That's right, even services designed specifically to provide education, are littered with misinformation that makes skin conditions worse.²⁰

The Choices Are Endless

So there’s an information vacuum, and the advice that fills it is often nonsense. If that wasn’t bad enough, there is also just too much choice when it comes to skincare products. Individuals are left with the daunting task of searching through thousands of products.²¹ You might think this is a good thing, giving people the choice of any product for their needs. But in the absence of someone to navigate this, too many options cause decision paralysis.²² This is made worse because ingredients are difficult to understand, and it's not always clear why or when a product should be used over another.

It's the reason why, at just 20, I settled for experiencing flare-ups every few days. Exhausted, not knowing where to start and experiencing decision paralysis. And I’m not alone, with 69% of people feeling helpless and choosing to self-care, without any input from traditional healthcare and defaulting to DIY treatments.²³ So clearly, something has to change…

It's Time For Change. Introducing…

The Avengers Of Dermatology

It's Time For Change. Introducing…

The Avengers Of Dermatology

The State Of Play

As we've covered, there are some fundamental barriers that prevent the ideal care for those with skin conditions:

  • Current approaches don’t work 60% of the time.

  • Care often doesn’t go beyond the skin, despite 50% of individuals experiencing mental health challenges.

  • Accessing healthcare services is limited with dermatologists in short supply.

  • It’s challenging to know which information to trust and there are often too many products to choose from.

No One’s Talking

These barriers have persisted over the past decade and nothing has come close to overcoming them. We believe that a large part of this is due to a lack of collaboration between the different players. Similar to how a car can’t function if all it’s parts aren’t working. The dermatology space can’t tackle these barriers unless all of the organisations cater to the needs of individuals’.

Let’s illustrate with an example. I’ve needed support from various organisations during my lifetime. When my eczema has been mild, I’ve turned to skincare brands for products. Whereas when it’s worsened, I’ve needed dermatologists for advice and stronger therapies. And these therapies are actually developed by a completely different entity, known as Life Science companies.

The problem is that these organisations don’t truly work together, despite the fact that I can switch from needing one organisation to another in a matter of days. And the biggest source of failure is that when I’m not in touch with any of them, I’m left on my own.²⁴

In essence, dermatology has huge crossover between research organisations, traditional clinical services and retail companies; reflecting the spectrum in people’s clinical condition. Yet often, these worlds don’t talk, leaving individuals stuck somewhere in the middle.²⁵

The first step to break this divide is by shifting from siloes to collaboration. To enable this, we need a super-connector - an organisation that serves as the glue between these industries whilst also providing support to individuals throughout their journey. Hint: that’s where Proton Health comes in.

The Avengers Of Dermatology

Our blueprint relies on the creation of an Avengers For Dermatology. Bringing together different organisations with their unique superpowers, to deliver transformative change.

Before we delve into our framework for accomplishing this, we’ll briefly summarise the players:

Life Science Companies - play a pivotal role in advancing dermatology therapies through cutting-edge research and development.

Skincare Brands - are instrumental in providing therapies and essential support, particularly for individuals with milder forms of skin conditions.

Dermatology Clinics - serve as crucial hubs for diagnosis and the administration of advanced therapies.

The Super-Connector - is at the heart of this collaborative framework. The Proton Health platform serves as a bridge between different dermatology organisations and individuals. For organisations, we help supercharge their capabilities and enable deeper personalisation. For individuals, we serve as a navigator and skin coach, depending on a person's needs.

Individuals - the most important part of the ecosystem, benefitting from this collaboration and providing consistent feedback to enhance the entire ecosystem.

Operation Phoenix.

Operation Phoenix.

The obvious thing is to, of course, give this process a codename. That's how Operation Phoenix was born. A mission that forms the basis for a rebirth in dermatology. A rising from the ashes if you will.

Here, we’ll outline how we’ll achieve this mission, the steps we’ve already taken and how individuals and dermatology organisations can leverage these principles.

Barrier: Current Approaches Aren’t Working.

1. Proactive, Preventative Care Needs To Be The Norm.

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Barrier: Current Approaches Aren’t Working.

1. Proactive, Preventative Care Needs To Be The Norm.

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Barrier: Current Approaches Aren’t Working.

1. Proactive, Preventative Care Needs To Be The Norm.

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There’s a need to shift from reacting to flare-ups to predicting and preventing them before they occur. This needs a few technological breakthroughs to accomplish:

  • Predicting flare-ups at least a few days in advance. This has been achieved by a team of researchers that built EczemaPred, a method to predict flare-ups.²⁶ Our team at Proton Health have also accomplished this, with a 94% predictive accuracy up to 4 days into the future for eczema, with models for other conditions in the pipeline.

  • Understanding the individual triggers for breakouts. This is the ability to identify the impact of personal and environmental causes of flare-ups. This requires vast amount of different datapoints, something that’s we've been doing with the Proton Health platform, with models being trained to achieve this in Q2 2024.

  • Developing personalised therapies. This requires improvements in dermatology research to tailor treatments based on an individuals genetic makeup, lifestyle and environmental factors.

There are other immediate steps that can be taken to help usher in a preventative approach. The following suggestions outline how individuals and dermatology organisations can leverage this approach.

There’s a need to shift from reacting to flare-ups to predicting and preventing them before they occur. This needs a few technological breakthroughs to accomplish:

  • Predicting flare-ups at least a few days in advance. This has been achieved by a team of researchers that built EczemaPred, a method to predict flare-ups.²⁶ Our team at Proton Health have also accomplished this, with a 94% predictive accuracy up to 4 days into the future for eczema, with models for other conditions in the pipeline.

  • Understanding the individual triggers for breakouts. This is the ability to identify the impact of personal and environmental causes of flare-ups. This requires vast amount of different datapoints, something that’s we've been doing with the Proton Health platform, with models being trained to achieve this in Q2 2024.

  • Developing personalised therapies. This requires improvements in dermatology research to tailor treatments based on an individuals genetic makeup, lifestyle and environmental factors.

There are other immediate steps that can be taken to help usher in a preventative approach. The following suggestions outline how individuals and dermatology organisations can leverage this approach.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • Journal your symptoms and triggers regularly. This enables you to identify the cause of your flare-ups and understand when you’re likely to flare-up.

  • For instance, I used the Proton Health app to track my eczema daily. This lead to some interesting discoveries including the fact that lack of sleep, dust build up, nuts, eggs, strawberries, blueberries and aerosol deodorants all caused breakouts. Avoiding these had a dramatic effect on my skin, with irritation reducing within days and being flare-up free ever since.

  • Use your skincare products on a regular basis, even when you’re not flaring up. And if you’re trying new products, use them for at least 14 days to and track your skin condition at the same time to ensure there's an improvement.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • Try to leverage your expertise to deliver personalised care. A great example of this is offering skin quizzes to understand users’ needs and recommending certain therapies depending on the results. To take this further, you can provide tailored information and blogs depending on an individuals symptoms.

  • Alongside therapies, provide 2-3 critical pieces of information that help people understand how to make the most of your products. Having analysed over 350 different skincare companies, only a small minority offered proactive information post-purchase. You could try giving tailored tips within packaging and email campaigns after the buying process to improve your products efficacy and increase retention.

  • Go beyond providing skincare advice. Skin conditions are multi-factorial, so there are factors outside of your skincare products control that influence whether someone improves. A great way to improve efficacy is by supporting individuals to discover the cause of their flare-ups.

  • If you’re providing consultations, encourage a preventative approach and have a checklist of common triggers for certain skin conditions. We’ve put together a guide to get you started here.

  • Help people build habits to unlock your products benefits. Switching to a preventative approach requires healthy habit formation. Whether that’s a community challenge, making your product easier to use or a 30 day email campaign. Everything from your product design to communications can be leveraged to make using your products easier, more visible and gamified to increase retention.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • Journal your symptoms and triggers regularly. This enables you to identify the cause of your flare-ups and understand when you’re likely to flare-up.

  • For instance, I used the Proton Health app to track my eczema daily. This lead to some interesting discoveries including the fact that lack of sleep, dust build up, nuts, eggs, strawberries, blueberries and aerosol deodorants all caused breakouts. Avoiding these had a dramatic effect on my skin, with irritation reducing within days and being flare-up free ever since.

  • Use your skincare products on a regular basis, even when you’re not flaring up. And if you’re trying new products, use them for at least 14 days to and track your skin condition at the same time to ensure there's an improvement.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • Try to leverage your expertise to deliver personalised care. A great example of this is offering skin quizzes to understand users’ needs and recommending certain therapies depending on the results. To take this further, you can provide tailored information and blogs depending on an individuals symptoms.

  • Alongside therapies, provide 2-3 critical pieces of information that help people understand how to make the most of your products. Having analysed over 350 different skincare companies, only a small minority offered proactive information post-purchase. You could try giving tailored tips within packaging and email campaigns after the buying process to improve your products efficacy and increase retention.

  • Go beyond providing skincare advice. Skin conditions are multi-factorial, so there are factors outside of your skincare products control that influence whether someone improves. A great way to improve efficacy is by supporting individuals to discover the cause of their flare-ups.

  • If you’re providing consultations, encourage a preventative approach and have a checklist of common triggers for certain skin conditions. We’ve put together a guide to get you started here.

  • Help people build habits to unlock your products benefits. Switching to a preventative approach requires healthy habit formation. Whether that’s a community challenge, making your product easier to use or a 30 day email campaign. Everything from your product design to communications can be leveraged to make using your products easier, more visible and gamified to increase retention.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • Journal your symptoms and triggers regularly. This enables you to identify the cause of your flare-ups and understand when you’re likely to flare-up.

  • For instance, I used the Proton Health app to track my eczema daily. This lead to some interesting discoveries including the fact that lack of sleep, dust build up, nuts, eggs, strawberries, blueberries and aerosol deodorants all caused breakouts. Avoiding these had a dramatic effect on my skin, with irritation reducing within days and being flare-up free ever since.

  • Use your skincare products on a regular basis, even when you’re not flaring up. And if you’re trying new products, use them for at least 14 days to and track your skin condition at the same time to ensure there's an improvement.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • Try to leverage your expertise to deliver personalised care. A great example of this is offering skin quizzes to understand users’ needs and recommending certain therapies depending on the results. To take this further, you can provide tailored information and blogs depending on an individuals symptoms.

  • Alongside therapies, provide 2-3 critical pieces of information that help people understand how to make the most of your products. Having analysed over 350 different skincare companies, only a small minority offered proactive information post-purchase. You could try giving tailored tips within packaging and email campaigns after the buying process to improve your products efficacy and increase retention.

  • Go beyond providing skincare advice. Skin conditions are multi-factorial, so there are factors outside of your skincare products control that influence whether someone improves. A great way to improve efficacy is by supporting individuals to discover the cause of their flare-ups.

  • If you’re providing consultations, encourage a preventative approach and have a checklist of common triggers for certain skin conditions. We’ve put together a guide to get you started here.

  • Help people build habits to unlock your products benefits. Switching to a preventative approach requires healthy habit formation. Whether that’s a community challenge, making your product easier to use or a 30 day email campaign. Everything from your product design to communications can be leveraged to make using your products easier, more visible and gamified to increase retention.

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We’ve built the Skin Score, a simple way for individuals to journal their skin condition on a daily basis, take photos and understand their triggers.

  • Our algorithms provide bespoke insights to help people discover their triggers, focus areas and receive personal recommendations.

  • We give people the ability to predict their flare-ups in advance. This enables individuals to step up their treatments to get ahead of breakouts.

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How Proton Health Helps.

  • We’ve built the Skin Score, a simple way for individuals to journal their skin condition on a daily basis, take photos and understand their triggers.

  • Our algorithms provide bespoke insights to help people discover their triggers, focus areas and receive personal recommendations.

  • We give people the ability to predict their flare-ups in advance. This enables individuals to step up their treatments to get ahead of breakouts.

Premium UX Template for Framer

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We’ve built the Skin Score, a simple way for individuals to journal their skin condition on a daily basis, take photos and understand their triggers.

  • Our algorithms provide bespoke insights to help people discover their triggers, focus areas and receive personal recommendations.

  • We give people the ability to predict their flare-ups in advance. This enables individuals to step up their treatments to get ahead of breakouts.

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Barrier: Care Doesn’t Go Beyond The Skin..

2. Holistic Care Is A Must.

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Barrier: Care Doesn’t Go Beyond The Skin..

2. Holistic Care Is A Must.

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Barrier: Care Doesn’t Go Beyond The Skin..

2. Holistic Care Is A Must.

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It’s easy to forget that skin conditions go deeper than the skin. Often impacting sleep, work, relationships and much more. Yet to this day, there’s no established therapy to tackle issues associated with skin conditions.²⁷

This is why we developed the Dermatology Behavioural Therapy programme. It includes 100+ reflection, mindfulness and cognitive therapy sessions designed to reframe peoples relationship with their condition. But more awareness is needed of the mental health impact and similar initiatives to holistically manage skin conditions.

The other aspect is a need to tackle the itch-scratch and picking-breakout cycles. Whilst research is abundant on this topic, habit-reversal programmes are rarely seen in practice. To address this, we’ve translated this work into habit-reversal programme delivered over a 6 week period. This has astounding results, with evidence showing that long-term skin conditions can be reversed using these techniques alone.²⁸

The final focus area is to provide a support network for those with skin conditions. It can be a lonely journey, especially when having a breakout, so having regular contact with other individuals is important. And there are various resources, including communities on Reddit and the Proton Health Forum. They also present great avenues for dermatology organisations to engage with individuals and better serve their needs.

It’s easy to forget that skin conditions go deeper than the skin. Often impacting sleep, work, relationships and much more. Yet to this day, there’s no established therapy to tackle issues associated with skin conditions.²⁷

This is why we developed the Dermatology Behavioural Therapy programme. It includes 100+ reflection, mindfulness and cognitive therapy sessions designed to reframe peoples relationship with their condition. But more awareness is needed of the mental health impact and similar initiatives to holistically manage skin conditions.

The other aspect is a need to tackle the itch-scratch and picking-breakout cycles. Whilst research is abundant on this topic, habit-reversal programmes are rarely seen in practice. To address this, we’ve translated this work into habit-reversal programme delivered over a 6 week period. This has astounding results, with evidence showing that long-term skin conditions can be reversed using these techniques alone.²⁸

The final focus area is to provide a support network for those with skin conditions. It can be a lonely journey, especially when having a breakout, so having regular contact with other individuals is important. And there are various resources, including communities on Reddit and the Proton Health Forum. They also present great avenues for dermatology organisations to engage with individuals and better serve their needs.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • If you find yourself anxious about a future flare-up or stressed because of a breakout, behavioural techniques can help. Using mindfulness helps reframe your relationship with your skin and tackle the negative emotions associated with the condition. It’s also a great way to manage stress, which has itself been shown to cause breakouts.

  • Catch and reverse your negative thought patterns. If you're ever unkind to yourself, remember that this is simply a negative thought pattern. For instance, this could be a mean comment that you tell yourself when you look in the mirror, or the thought that a flare-up will ruin your day. Try to recognise these whenever they occur, and once you've built up this awareness, replace them with a more positive thought instead. This is a proven way to break harmful habits and improve your self-esteem. And it's the primary way that I broke my negative thought cycles.

  • If scratching and picking are common issues, use habit-reversal techniques to break these behaviours. I found myself scratching over 180 times per day. But having used the Proton Health Itch-Scratch programme, I reduced this to less than 10 times per day and significantly reduced symptoms. The process involves recognising whenever you scratch, then using a competing response, something like clenching your fist, when you next have the urge. You'll find more info on the process here.

  • It can be easy to feel like you’re alone when you have a skin condition. This is a super common experience but you can combat this by tapping into communities on Reddit, Facebook and the Proton Health app.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re delivering care to individuals, don’t forget about mental health. Often, I needed help coping with stress rather than my symptoms, but found myself reluctant to ask. So explicitly asking can be a great way to uncover a person’s emotional burden and provide further support.

  • Improving stress and mental health is a proven way to reduce symptoms. This, in turn, improves the effectiveness of products and healthcare services. So leverage these effects by providing behavioural therapy resources to improve a persons quality of life and brand affinity. Other ideas are including some CBT techniques as part of your product packaging, encouraging mindfulness skincare practices and creating audio-guided sessions.

  • There are very few therapies designed to specifically target scratching and picking. As such, this represents a huge opportunity for skincare brands and dermatology services. Other suggestions include providing information on how people can break these cycles using habit-reversal. We’d recommend the following guide as a starting point. Leverage this to benefit your users, improve your products efficacy and build brand advocacy.

  • A great way to learn more about users’ needs and deliver effective education is by engaging in communities. There are some great places including Reddit, Facebook and the Proton Health app to seek feedback, provide advice and learn about emerging needs. And by contributing to these communities, you’ll build brand advocacy and organic referrals.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • If you find yourself anxious about a future flare-up or stressed because of a breakout, behavioural techniques can help. Using mindfulness helps reframe your relationship with your skin and tackle the negative emotions associated with the condition. It’s also a great way to manage stress, which has itself been shown to cause breakouts.

  • Catch and reverse your negative thought patterns. If you're ever unkind to yourself, remember that this is simply a negative thought pattern. For instance, this could be a mean comment that you tell yourself when you look in the mirror, or the thought that a flare-up will ruin your day. Try to recognise these whenever they occur, and once you've built up this awareness, replace them with a more positive thought instead. This is a proven way to break harmful habits and improve your self-esteem. And it's the primary way that I broke my negative thought cycles.

  • If scratching and picking are common issues, use habit-reversal techniques to break these behaviours. I found myself scratching over 180 times per day. But having used the Proton Health Itch-Scratch programme, I reduced this to less than 10 times per day and significantly reduced symptoms. The process involves recognising whenever you scratch, then using a competing response, something like clenching your fist, when you next have the urge. You'll find more info on the process here.

  • It can be easy to feel like you’re alone when you have a skin condition. This is a super common experience but you can combat this by tapping into communities on Reddit, Facebook and the Proton Health app.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re delivering care to individuals, don’t forget about mental health. Often, I needed help coping with stress rather than my symptoms, but found myself reluctant to ask. So explicitly asking can be a great way to uncover a person’s emotional burden and provide further support.

  • Improving stress and mental health is a proven way to reduce symptoms. This, in turn, improves the effectiveness of products and healthcare services. So leverage these effects by providing behavioural therapy resources to improve a persons quality of life and brand affinity. Other ideas are including some CBT techniques as part of your product packaging, encouraging mindfulness skincare practices and creating audio-guided sessions.

  • There are very few therapies designed to specifically target scratching and picking. As such, this represents a huge opportunity for skincare brands and dermatology services. Other suggestions include providing information on how people can break these cycles using habit-reversal. We’d recommend the following guide as a starting point. Leverage this to benefit your users, improve your products efficacy and build brand advocacy.

  • A great way to learn more about users’ needs and deliver effective education is by engaging in communities. There are some great places including Reddit, Facebook and the Proton Health app to seek feedback, provide advice and learn about emerging needs. And by contributing to these communities, you’ll build brand advocacy and organic referrals.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • If you find yourself anxious about a future flare-up or stressed because of a breakout, behavioural techniques can help. Using mindfulness helps reframe your relationship with your skin and tackle the negative emotions associated with the condition. It’s also a great way to manage stress, which has itself been shown to cause breakouts.

  • Catch and reverse your negative thought patterns. If you're ever unkind to yourself, remember that this is simply a negative thought pattern. For instance, this could be a mean comment that you tell yourself when you look in the mirror, or the thought that a flare-up will ruin your day. Try to recognise these whenever they occur, and once you've built up this awareness, replace them with a more positive thought instead. This is a proven way to break harmful habits and improve your self-esteem. And it's the primary way that I broke my negative thought cycles.

  • If scratching and picking are common issues, use habit-reversal techniques to break these behaviours. I found myself scratching over 180 times per day. But having used the Proton Health Itch-Scratch programme, I reduced this to less than 10 times per day and significantly reduced symptoms. The process involves recognising whenever you scratch, then using a competing response, something like clenching your fist, when you next have the urge. You'll find more info on the process here.

  • It can be easy to feel like you’re alone when you have a skin condition. This is a super common experience but you can combat this by tapping into communities on Reddit, Facebook and the Proton Health app.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re delivering care to individuals, don’t forget about mental health. Often, I needed help coping with stress rather than my symptoms, but found myself reluctant to ask. So explicitly asking can be a great way to uncover a person’s emotional burden and provide further support.

  • Improving stress and mental health is a proven way to reduce symptoms. This, in turn, improves the effectiveness of products and healthcare services. So leverage these effects by providing behavioural therapy resources to improve a persons quality of life and brand affinity. Other ideas are including some CBT techniques as part of your product packaging, encouraging mindfulness skincare practices and creating audio-guided sessions.

  • There are very few therapies designed to specifically target scratching and picking. As such, this represents a huge opportunity for skincare brands and dermatology services. Other suggestions include providing information on how people can break these cycles using habit-reversal. We’d recommend the following guide as a starting point. Leverage this to benefit your users, improve your products efficacy and build brand advocacy.

  • A great way to learn more about users’ needs and deliver effective education is by engaging in communities. There are some great places including Reddit, Facebook and the Proton Health app to seek feedback, provide advice and learn about emerging needs. And by contributing to these communities, you’ll build brand advocacy and organic referrals.

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We’ve created the world’s first Dermatology Behavioural Therapy programme. It includes 100+ reflection, mindfulness and behavioural sessions to help elevate quality of life.

  • Proton Health features bespoke habit-reversal programmes based on the latest evidence to break the Itch-Scratch and Picking-Breakout cycles.

  • The Proton Health Community serves as a support network for many individuals with dermatology conditions. It’s as a peer to peer forum for product advice, recommendations and mental health support.

Premium UX Template for Framer

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We’ve created the world’s first Dermatology Behavioural Therapy programme. It includes 100+ reflection, mindfulness and behavioural sessions to help elevate quality of life.

  • Proton Health features bespoke habit-reversal programmes based on the latest evidence to break the Itch-Scratch and Picking-Breakout cycles.

  • The Proton Health Community serves as a support network for many individuals with dermatology conditions. It’s as a peer to peer forum for product advice, recommendations and mental health support.

Premium UX Template for Framer

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We’ve created the world’s first Dermatology Behavioural Therapy programme. It includes 100+ reflection, mindfulness and behavioural sessions to help elevate quality of life.

  • Proton Health features bespoke habit-reversal programmes based on the latest evidence to break the Itch-Scratch and Picking-Breakout cycles.

  • The Proton Health Community serves as a support network for many individuals with dermatology conditions. It’s as a peer to peer forum for product advice, recommendations and mental health support.

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Barrier: Current Approaches Aren’t Working.

3. The Locus Of Control Needs To Change.

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Barrier: Current Approaches Aren’t Working.

3. The Locus Of Control Needs To Change.

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Barrier: Current Approaches Aren’t Working.

3. The Locus Of Control Needs To Change.

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It’s extremely difficult to improve access to traditional healthcare in the short term. This might be thought as harmful, but we’d argue that this trend gives an opportunity for individuals to become self-reliant. In fact, we belief that the healthcare system needs to be centred around individuals for long-term skin conditions. Because no one is better qualified to understand and manage their skin, than individuals that live with it day in day out.

That’s how we see dermatology shifting. Less reliance on traditional healthcare staff, and increased empowerment to individuals. In other words, the locus of control needs to change. And this has a net benefit for both individuals and healthcare staff:

  • It enables people to become familiar with their own symptoms, triggers, ideal skincare routine and mental health. This in turn allows better condition management.

  • Healthcare staff will shift to serve as advisors for important needs. This improves the efficiency of the entire system - allowing clinicians to advise on 1-2 critical aspects that will make the most impact, instead of spreading themselves too thin trying to provide generic advice that can be accessed elsewhere.

To achieve this, we also need to begin delivering asynchronous care. This is the time period when an individual can’t speak to a healthcare professional. And it’s where we see our platform sitting. Providing comprehensive advice and allowing individuals to discover their symptoms and triggers at their own pace. This information can then be used to guide whether an individual requires support from a skincare brand or a healthcare professional.

It’s extremely difficult to improve access to traditional healthcare in the short term. This might be thought as harmful, but we’d argue that this trend gives an opportunity for individuals to become self-reliant. In fact, we belief that the healthcare system needs to be centred around individuals for long-term skin conditions. Because no one is better qualified to understand and manage their skin, than individuals that live with it day in day out.

That’s how we see dermatology shifting. Less reliance on traditional healthcare staff, and increased empowerment to individuals. In other words, the locus of control needs to change. And this has a net benefit for both individuals and healthcare staff:

  • It enables people to become familiar with their own symptoms, triggers, ideal skincare routine and mental health. This in turn allows better condition management.

  • Healthcare staff will shift to serve as advisors for important needs. This improves the efficiency of the entire system - allowing clinicians to advise on 1-2 critical aspects that will make the most impact, instead of spreading themselves too thin trying to provide generic advice that can be accessed elsewhere.

To achieve this, we also need to begin delivering asynchronous care. This is the time period when an individual can’t speak to a healthcare professional. And it’s where we see our platform sitting. Providing comprehensive advice and allowing individuals to discover their symptoms and triggers at their own pace. This information can then be used to guide whether an individual requires support from a skincare brand or a healthcare professional.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • It can be easy to feel like you’re a prisoner in your own skin. I’ve felt this for years. But to do this gives away the control you have over your skin condition. There are a couple of ways to break this thought pattern - the first is to recognise that you have total control over how you respond to flare-ups. The second is that you and you alone have the power to change it's course. Try to remember these two points daily and you’ll begin changing the locus of your control.

  • Try journalling regularly. Not only your symptoms and triggers, but also your emotions. This is a great way to detach from events and better handle negative emotions. Journalling also gives you a better understanding of your skin for when you visit a healthcare professional; making consultations more effective.

  • Take control of your health. Try to regularly seek validated information and use your healthcare professional as a guide in your journey. When visiting a clinician, make sure to provide details about symptoms and have a list of 2-3 questions that you'd like covered. Using the Proton Health app is a great way to access evidence-based information and to build an improved understanding of your symptoms.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re treating individuals with skin conditions, ensure that the message of prevention and taking responsibility is emphasised. A great gateway is to encourage journalling and for the results to be shown in future consultations.

  • There’s a big shift emerging in the doctor-patient relationship with individuals more informed than ever before. Try to lean into this trend by welcoming questions and trying to focus on a few high-impact areas as opposed to trying to cover all bases in a single consultation.

  • Enable individuals to take care of their own health by summarising consultations with a few action points. It’s often difficult for people to take in a lot of advice, so a high level summary of the activities to complete in between consultations is beneficial. Another suggestion is to provide information on who to contact and how to re-engage with questions when necessary.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • It can be easy to feel like you’re a prisoner in your own skin. I’ve felt this for years. But to do this gives away the control you have over your skin condition. There are a couple of ways to break this thought pattern - the first is to recognise that you have total control over how you respond to flare-ups. The second is that you and you alone have the power to change it's course. Try to remember these two points daily and you’ll begin changing the locus of your control.

  • Try journalling regularly. Not only your symptoms and triggers, but also your emotions. This is a great way to detach from events and better handle negative emotions. Journalling also gives you a better understanding of your skin for when you visit a healthcare professional; making consultations more effective.

  • Take control of your health. Try to regularly seek validated information and use your healthcare professional as a guide in your journey. When visiting a clinician, make sure to provide details about symptoms and have a list of 2-3 questions that you'd like covered. Using the Proton Health app is a great way to access evidence-based information and to build an improved understanding of your symptoms.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re treating individuals with skin conditions, ensure that the message of prevention and taking responsibility is emphasised. A great gateway is to encourage journalling and for the results to be shown in future consultations.

  • There’s a big shift emerging in the doctor-patient relationship with individuals more informed than ever before. Try to lean into this trend by welcoming questions and trying to focus on a few high-impact areas as opposed to trying to cover all bases in a single consultation.

  • Enable individuals to take care of their own health by summarising consultations with a few action points. It’s often difficult for people to take in a lot of advice, so a high level summary of the activities to complete in between consultations is beneficial. Another suggestion is to provide information on who to contact and how to re-engage with questions when necessary.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • It can be easy to feel like you’re a prisoner in your own skin. I’ve felt this for years. But to do this gives away the control you have over your skin condition. There are a couple of ways to break this thought pattern - the first is to recognise that you have total control over how you respond to flare-ups. The second is that you and you alone have the power to change it's course. Try to remember these two points daily and you’ll begin changing the locus of your control.

  • Try journalling regularly. Not only your symptoms and triggers, but also your emotions. This is a great way to detach from events and better handle negative emotions. Journalling also gives you a better understanding of your skin for when you visit a healthcare professional; making consultations more effective.

  • Take control of your health. Try to regularly seek validated information and use your healthcare professional as a guide in your journey. When visiting a clinician, make sure to provide details about symptoms and have a list of 2-3 questions that you'd like covered. Using the Proton Health app is a great way to access evidence-based information and to build an improved understanding of your symptoms.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re treating individuals with skin conditions, ensure that the message of prevention and taking responsibility is emphasised. A great gateway is to encourage journalling and for the results to be shown in future consultations.

  • There’s a big shift emerging in the doctor-patient relationship with individuals more informed than ever before. Try to lean into this trend by welcoming questions and trying to focus on a few high-impact areas as opposed to trying to cover all bases in a single consultation.

  • Enable individuals to take care of their own health by summarising consultations with a few action points. It’s often difficult for people to take in a lot of advice, so a high level summary of the activities to complete in between consultations is beneficial. Another suggestion is to provide information on who to contact and how to re-engage with questions when necessary.

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We equip individuals with the ability to track symptoms and triggers in real time, which promotes better understanding of their condition.

  • We provide self-management articles on a daily basis. This enables better asynchronous care and promotes healthier skin habits.

Premium UX Template for Framer

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We equip individuals with the ability to track symptoms and triggers in real time, which promotes better understanding of their condition.

  • We provide self-management articles on a daily basis. This enables better asynchronous care and promotes healthier skin habits.

Premium UX Template for Framer

How Proton Health Helps.

  • We equip individuals with the ability to track symptoms and triggers in real time, which promotes better understanding of their condition.

  • We provide self-management articles on a daily basis. This enables better asynchronous care and promotes healthier skin habits.

Premium UX Template for Framer

Barrier: It’s Difficult To Know Who To Trust.

4. Individuals Need Improved Healthcare Navigation.

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Barrier: It’s Difficult To Know Who To Trust.

4. Individuals Need Improved Healthcare Navigation.

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Barrier: It’s Difficult To Know Who To Trust.

4. Individuals Need Improved Healthcare Navigation.

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People often find themselves travelling on their skin journey without a map. And when it seems like they’re about to strike gold, it’s often false treasure with yet more poor advice. Instead, we need improved healthcare navigation with credible sources of information. A map, to know who to use, when it’s appropriate and how they to effectively manage skin conditions using the latest evidence.

This is a large part of our work at Proton Health. Where we’ve analysed over 350 academic papers and distilled this content into hundreds of different sessions. They form a larger programme that takes 8-12 weeks to complete, focussing on three distinct areas: Skin, Mental Health and Triggers. Each day, we suggest personalised activities for individuals to complete as part of these core themes. This includes tracking symptoms and triggers, taking part in educational articles, completing quizzes, listening to audio sessions and much more.

In addition to validated sources of information, there’s a need to help people know where to go. This is something that we’re striving towards, with a skincare marketplace and curated dermatologist directory to deliver improved navigation. Our marketplace is curated to focus on evidence-based therapies and clinics depending on an individuals location.

People often find themselves travelling on their skin journey without a map. And when it seems like they’re about to strike gold, it’s often false treasure with yet more poor advice. Instead, we need improved healthcare navigation with credible sources of information. A map, to know who to use, when it’s appropriate and how they to effectively manage skin conditions using the latest evidence.

This is a large part of our work at Proton Health. Where we’ve analysed over 350 academic papers and distilled this content into hundreds of different sessions. They form a larger programme that takes 8-12 weeks to complete, focussing on three distinct areas: Skin, Mental Health and Triggers. Each day, we suggest personalised activities for individuals to complete as part of these core themes. This includes tracking symptoms and triggers, taking part in educational articles, completing quizzes, listening to audio sessions and much more.

In addition to validated sources of information, there’s a need to help people know where to go. This is something that we’re striving towards, with a skincare marketplace and curated dermatologist directory to deliver improved navigation. Our marketplace is curated to focus on evidence-based therapies and clinics depending on an individuals location.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • Look for credible sources of information and well researched content. Remember, individual stories aren’t necessarily true or false. Instead, make sure that any advice is backed up by several sources or groups of credible individuals.

  • For instance, since using the Proton Health programme, I’ve learnt that I’ve been making huge mistakes with my skincare. A few examples include the need to use a spoon/tool to take out cream from emollient tubs (because of the bacteria associated with using your fingers). Another is to use the tips of your fingers to apply products instead of your palms. And a final mistake is to apply products in one direction. I.e. not up and down as it introduces a risk of infection.

  • Seek evidence based ingredients and well-researched brands. A product that helped me considerably was Niacinamide, also known as Vitamin B3. It’s a non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory product that’s great for flare-ups. I also found red light therapy to help improve skin healing and prevent inflammation. You can find many more suggestions here.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re treating those with skin conditions, offer validated sources of information or consider creating your own resources for common questions and focus areas.

  • It’s difficult to know why someone should pick your product over another. If your product has an effective ingredient for a particular symptom, make sure to mention it. Equally, if it isn’t designed for a particular symptom or severity, offer some advice on how a person can manage it and signpost to other resources. This is a technique that’s shown to improve trust and increases the chances of word-of-mouth referrals.

  • Help your products to stand out by mentioning the specific ingredients included. Also provide advise on how, when and why a person should be using your products. You can take this one step further by getting feedback regularly to improve future iterations and to uncover new use cases.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • Look for credible sources of information and well researched content. Remember, individual stories aren’t necessarily true or false. Instead, make sure that any advice is backed up by several sources or groups of credible individuals.

  • For instance, since using the Proton Health programme, I’ve learnt that I’ve been making huge mistakes with my skincare. A few examples include the need to use a spoon/tool to take out cream from emollient tubs (because of the bacteria associated with using your fingers). Another is to use the tips of your fingers to apply products instead of your palms. And a final mistake is to apply products in one direction. I.e. not up and down as it introduces a risk of infection.

  • Seek evidence based ingredients and well-researched brands. A product that helped me considerably was Niacinamide, also known as Vitamin B3. It’s a non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory product that’s great for flare-ups. I also found red light therapy to help improve skin healing and prevent inflammation. You can find many more suggestions here.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re treating those with skin conditions, offer validated sources of information or consider creating your own resources for common questions and focus areas.

  • It’s difficult to know why someone should pick your product over another. If your product has an effective ingredient for a particular symptom, make sure to mention it. Equally, if it isn’t designed for a particular symptom or severity, offer some advice on how a person can manage it and signpost to other resources. This is a technique that’s shown to improve trust and increases the chances of word-of-mouth referrals.

  • Help your products to stand out by mentioning the specific ingredients included. Also provide advise on how, when and why a person should be using your products. You can take this one step further by getting feedback regularly to improve future iterations and to uncover new use cases.

💡 Recommendations

For Individuals 👋

  • Look for credible sources of information and well researched content. Remember, individual stories aren’t necessarily true or false. Instead, make sure that any advice is backed up by several sources or groups of credible individuals.

  • For instance, since using the Proton Health programme, I’ve learnt that I’ve been making huge mistakes with my skincare. A few examples include the need to use a spoon/tool to take out cream from emollient tubs (because of the bacteria associated with using your fingers). Another is to use the tips of your fingers to apply products instead of your palms. And a final mistake is to apply products in one direction. I.e. not up and down as it introduces a risk of infection.

  • Seek evidence based ingredients and well-researched brands. A product that helped me considerably was Niacinamide, also known as Vitamin B3. It’s a non-steroidal, anti-inflammatory product that’s great for flare-ups. I also found red light therapy to help improve skin healing and prevent inflammation. You can find many more suggestions here.

For Dermatology Organisations 🚀

  • If you’re treating those with skin conditions, offer validated sources of information or consider creating your own resources for common questions and focus areas.

  • It’s difficult to know why someone should pick your product over another. If your product has an effective ingredient for a particular symptom, make sure to mention it. Equally, if it isn’t designed for a particular symptom or severity, offer some advice on how a person can manage it and signpost to other resources. This is a technique that’s shown to improve trust and increases the chances of word-of-mouth referrals.

  • Help your products to stand out by mentioning the specific ingredients included. Also provide advise on how, when and why a person should be using your products. You can take this one step further by getting feedback regularly to improve future iterations and to uncover new use cases.

How Proton Health Helps.

  • The Proton Health programme has been built using 350+ evidence based papers. We help connect people to appropriate support, whether it’s delivering CBT sessions to overcome stress, recommendations to see a healthcare professional or specific skincare suggestions.

  • We’ve created a curated skincare marketplace that is selected based on product efficacy and we’re currently building a dermatologist directory.

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How Proton Health Helps.

  • The Proton Health programme has been built using 350+ evidence based papers. We help connect people to appropriate support, whether it’s delivering CBT sessions to overcome stress, recommendations to see a healthcare professional or specific skincare suggestions.

  • We’ve created a curated skincare marketplace that is selected based on product efficacy and we’re currently building a dermatologist directory.

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How Proton Health Helps.

  • The Proton Health programme has been built using 350+ evidence based papers. We help connect people to appropriate support, whether it’s delivering CBT sessions to overcome stress, recommendations to see a healthcare professional or specific skincare suggestions.

  • We’ve created a curated skincare marketplace that is selected based on product efficacy and we’re currently building a dermatologist directory.

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Proton Health - The Superconnector.

Proton Health - The Superconnector.

These barriers need an almighty force to overcome. If there’s anything we’ve realised, the status quo will always prevail unless there are strong efforts to change course. This Blueprint is our framework for achieving this aim. These recommendations are designed to stand the test of time. In 30 years, you’ll be hard pressed to find anyone that want’s less credible information or someone who doesn’t want their skincare condition to be holistically managed.

For Individuals

It can be difficult to know where to begin when you're diagnosed with a skin condition. Our recommendation would be to try out the Proton Health app, a solution that’s been tested with thousands of patients, showing 48% symptomatic improvements and 32% quality of life elevation. You'll find a bespoke programme of information, sessions focussed on mental health, insights to help you predict and prevent flare-ups, a solution community and so much more.

For Dermatology Organisations

If you’re skincare brand, life science organisation or dermatology clinic, we can help you implement these recommendations via our platform. Our solution is fully-customisable, and enables you to unlock deeper levels of personalisation. Our existing partners have used our platform to create Skincare quizzes, deliver bespoke apps, electronic patient records and much more.

Our existing partners include high profile skincare brands, eczema charities and dermatology clinics. These organisations have seen significant benefits with increased revenue, decreased acquisition costs and significantly increased retention metrics. Plus, you'll become a part of the Avengers For Dermatology, a collaborative ecosystem and the most ambitious project within dermatology in decades.

Our Platform.

Fully customisable technology that delivers transformative change.

Personalised Education Programme

Hundreds of clinically-evidenced articles, Mindfulness/CBT sessions, personalised recommendations and more to manage Acne, Eczema, Psoriasis and TSW.

Advanced Skin Tracking

Behavioural Therapy

Comprehensive Features

Personalised Education Programme

Hundreds of clinically-evidenced articles, CBT sessions, personalised recommendations and more to manage Acne, Eczema, Psoriasis and TSW.

Advanced Skin Tracking

Behavioural Therapy

Comprehensive Features

Personalised Education Programme

Hundreds of clinically-evidenced articles, CBT sessions, personalised recommendations and more to manage Acne, Eczema, Psoriasis and TSW.

Advanced Skin Tracking

Behavioural Therapy

Comprehensive Features

Learn More.

Discover how adding a 24/7 Digital Skin Coach can transform your organisation.

For Skincare Brands

Become an automated skincare clinic by leveraging our platform.

Increase Brand Value.

Enhance Retention.

Improve Clinical Outcomes.

For Life Sciences

Transform your R&D by incorporating Dermatology AI to your pipeline.

Increase Clinical Outcomes.

Elevate Retention.

Enhanced Satisfaction.

For Dermatology Clinics

Deliver personalised asynchronous care by using our platform.

Increased Patient Satisfaction.

Reduce Costs.

Enhanced Clinical Outcomes.

Contribute To Our Blueprint.

Reach out if you want to be a part of the most ambitious project within Dermatology in decades.

Get In Touch.

References

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